Throwback Thursdays

The HRCC’s Throwback Thursday social media series premiered in May 2020. The mission of the series is to highlight older research published by HRCC faculty that could be applied to health communication work during the global COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

The Role of Anxiety in Seeking and Retaining Risk Information: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework in Two Studies

The Role of Anxiety in Seeking and Retaining Risk Information: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework in Two Studies

January 14, 2021 - Dr. Monique Turner, Rajiv N. Rimal, Daniel Morrison, Hyojin Kim

This week’s #TBT comes from HRCC Faculty Feature of the month Dr. Monique Mitchell Turner, Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication at Michigan State University. The article focuses on why not all people engage in health information seeking behavior.

Between Likes and Shares

Between Likes and Shares

December 18, 2020 - Dr Saleem Alhabash, Dr. Nora Rifon, Dr. Anna McAlister, Dr. Elizabeth Quilliam, Dr. Jef Richards, Amy Hagerstrom

Last week's #TBT comes from HRCC Faculty Feature of the Month and Assistant Professor in the Department of Advertising and PR, Dr. Saleem Alhabash and Dr. Nora Rifon, HRCC affiliated faculty member and Professor in the Department of Advertising and PR and focuses on the emotional appeal and virality on the persuasiveness of anti-cyberbullying messages on Facebook.

Fear-Arousing Persuasive Messages

Fear-Arousing Persuasive Messages

December 3, 2020 - Franklin J. Boster and Paul Mongeau

This Throwback Thursday article is from Dr. Franklin J. Boster, former professor in the Michigan State University Department of Communication and Dr. Paul Mongeau, alum of the Michigan State University Communication PhD program. Their study focuses on the effect of incorporating fear-arousing material into a persuasive message and highlights major explanations of fear appeal effects.

A Turn Toward Avoidance? Selective Exposure to Online Political Information

A Turn Toward Avoidance? Selective Exposure to Online Political Information

November 12, 2020 - Dustin Carnahan, R. Kelly Garrett, Emily K. Lynch

Scholars warn that avoidance of attitude-discrepant political information is becoming increasingly common due in part to an ideologically fragmented online news environment that allows individuals to systematically eschew contact with ideas that differ from their own.

How Scientists View The Public, the Media and the Political Process

How Scientists View The Public, the Media and the Political Process

November 5, 2020 - John Besley, Matthew Nisbet

The first issue of Public Understanding of Science in 1992 included a suggestion that science com-munication scholars “supplement our studies and activities on the understanding of science by the public, with studies and activities on the understanding of the public by scientists” (Levy-Leblond, 1992: 20). In the last decade, a number of scholars have taken up this call using in-depth interviews, case studies and surveys with small samples to highlight common elements of scientists’ views about the public. Bauer, Allum and Miller (2007) argue that this phase of research largely began in the mid-1990s as a critique of “scientific institutions and experts who harbor prejudices about an ignorant public” (p. 85).

Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES): Documenting multiple outcomes in stuttering treatment

Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES): Documenting multiple outcomes in stuttering treatment

October 29, 2020 - Dr. J. Scott Yaruss, Robert W. Quesal

In recent years, there has been a growing discussion about the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the field of speech–language pathology. Although the changes associated with implementing EBP affect many aspects of the field, the need for clinicians to document the results of their intervention and to select treatment approaches based on a meaningful body of literature has been particularly apparent in the field of fluency disorders.

Health Promotion and the Knowledge-Attitude-Behavior Continuum

Health Promotion and the Knowledge-Attitude-Behavior Continuum

October 15, 2020 - Erv Bettinghaus

Influencing health behavior through informational campaigns, followed by the expectation of attitude change and subsequent desired behavior changes, is examined is this article by Erv Bettinghaus.

Student-Generated Protective Behaviors to Avert Severe Harm Due to High-Risk Alcohol Consumption

Student-Generated Protective Behaviors to Avert Severe Harm Due to High-Risk Alcohol Consumption

September 24, 2020 - Sandi Smith, Charles Atkin, Carolyn LaPlante, Katherine Klein, Wilma Novales Wibert, Edward Glazer, Alex Mayer, Dennis Martell

High-risk alcohol consumption is a significant problem on college campuses that many students see as a rite of passage in their development into adulthood. Developing effective prevention campaigns designed to lessen or avert the risks associated with alcohol consumption entails understanding how students perceive harmful consequences as well as the ways they protect themselves while drinking.

Can Fear Arousal in Public Health Campaigns Contribute to the Decline of HIV Prevalence?

Can Fear Arousal in Public Health Campaigns Contribute to the Decline of HIV Prevalence?

September 17, 2020 - Kim Witte and Edward C. Green

‘‘Fear appeal’’ campaigns, as they typically are called by academics, have been derided by American AIDS professionals as ‘‘amateurish,’’ ‘‘misguided,’’ and even unethical because they are seen as limiting one’s ability to consider dispassionately a range of responses to a perceived health threat. Yet, many African professionals have embraced fear-based campaigns and claim they are at least one of the reasons HIV infection rates dropped significantly in certain areas.

Communicating on Twitter during a disaster: An analysis of tweets during Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines

Communicating on Twitter during a disaster: An analysis of tweets during Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines

September 9, 2020 - Bruno Takahashi, Edson C. Tandoc Jr., Christine Carmichael

September is National Preparedness Month which promotes family and community disaster planning now and throughout the year. Social media in crisis situations, such as natural disasters, has been recognized by scholars and practitioners as key communication channels that can complement traditional channels. This study from Bruno Takahashi, Edson C. Tandoc Jr. and Christine Carmichael examines Twitter use during and after Typhoon Haiyan pummeled the Philippines.

Reading About the Flu Online: How Health-Protective Behavioral Intentions Are Influenced byMedia Multitasking, Polychronicity, and Strength of Health-Related Arguments

Reading About the Flu Online: How Health-Protective Behavioral Intentions Are Influenced byMedia Multitasking, Polychronicity, and Strength of Health-Related Arguments

August 26, 2020 - Anastasia Kononova, Shupei Yuan and Eunsin Joo

As health organizations increasingly use the Internet to communicate medical information and advice (Shortliffe et al., 2000; World Health Organization, 2013), studying factors that affect health information processing and health-protective behaviors becomes extremely important.